An EU Protectorate How Brussels Is Trying to Prevent a Collapse of the Euro

By Armin Mahler, , Wolfgang Reuter and

Part 2: Is Germany to Blame?


The Commission has recommended that Spain, booming until recently, radically restructure its economy. Spain must significantly shrink its bloated construction sector and focus on economic sectors with higher productivity.

France and Italy have been given homework assignments of their own. Both countries are being asked to apply austerity packages and increase labor-market flexibility. France must also get its significant welfare and unemployment expenses under control.

Resentment is growing in the countries most directly affected. But that frustration is not directed, as might be expected, toward the Commission. Instead, it is increasingly surplus countries coming under fire -- with Germany at the forefront.

Representatives from Spain and Portugal especially -- but also from France -- hold Germany accountable for their current woes. They aren't alone in that opinion either. "The Greek crisis has German roots," says Heiner Flassbeck, chief economist at the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), in Geneva. It was German wage dumping that got the country's European neighbors in trouble, he says.

At Its Neighbors' Expense

EU officials don't phrase it quite so strongly, but they still accuse Germany more than any other country of gaining advantages for itself at its neighbors' expense, using its policy of low wages to make German products increasingly attractive relative to those from other countries.

As a precautionary measure, officials at Berlin's Finance Ministry have gathered arguments that Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble can put forward in the country's defense. Germany's position is that the countries now in crisis are themselves at fault for their situation. They lived beyond their means for years, the German government says, financing their economic boom on credit. Now the financial crisis has revealed their weaknesses.

Germany didn't have it easy with the euro in the beginning either, continues the argument, because the country wasn't competitive compared to other member countries -- but it regained its strength with a great deal of trouble and effort, through reforms.

German officials point to the fact that the country made its labor market more flexible through the Hartz package of welfare reforms and say that state finances are more stable than before, despite the crisis. They add that taking this same path would lead the currently troubled countries out of the crisis. And, they continue, the federal government is not responsible for lagging wage growth because, in Germany, salaries and wages are negotiated between employers and unions rather than being imposed by the government.

The German government also claims no responsibility for the country's export surplus. German firms are competitive not because of government policy, it says, but because of entrepreneurial decisions and the preferences of customers around the world.

Create More Competition

When this debate flared up recently within the euro-zone countries, Schäuble received support from the top for his position. The southern members of the euro zone shouldn't be ungrateful, warned ECB President Jean-Claude Trichet. After all, he reasons, Germany funded the deficits with its surpluses. Nonetheless, the Commission called on Germany to make further changes as well. The country should boost domestic demand, increase investment in infrastructure and create more competition in the service sector.

The Commission believes the currency union can exist in the long term only if member countries' governments implement reforms and coordinate their economic policies. Schäuble's experts agree. They are proposing -- partly with an eye toward mollifying France -- a common German-French initiative.

Both countries' governments should work toward better coordination, the German financial experts say. Merely monitoring deficits has turned out to be inadequate. In the future, they suggest, euro-zone governments should also focus on combating differing inflation rates and step in early when capital bubbles develop.

France, no doubt, would gladly accept such a proposal. Paris, after all, has long called for Europe-wide financial governance. Until now it was Germany that opposed the idea.

The euro-zone governments have started to rethink their positions, but will action necessarily follow? The past never lacked in good intentions either, but political calculation always won out in the end. How else would Greece have managed to become a member of the common currency zone? Why else would Brussels stand by for so long without taking action? It was far from secret that Greece had been cooking its books for years.

Financial Trickery

Back in the fall of 2004, Eurostat, the EU body in charge of statistics, calculated that Greece's officially announced debts of between 1.4 percent and 2.0 percent of gross domestic product between 2000 and 2003 were incorrect. In reality, the amount was nearly three times as high, falling between 3.7 percent and 4.6 percent. The statisticians surmised that Athens had whitewashed its finances in previous years, too. Greece, in fact, would never have met the conditions for membership in the common currency without such trickery.

But the country was not immediately banned from the euro zone, nor were other sanctions imposed. Instead, member countries discussed how the statistics could be improved and made more accurate. Not much emerged from all the talk.

Outgoing European Commissioner for Enterprise and Industry Günter Verheugen remembers all too well that, for a long time, the problem with Greece was simply not something that was talked about. He finds it hard to believe that this "disproportionate regard" for Greece had nothing to do with that fact that conservative allies of European Commission President José Manuel Barroso governed in Athens for five years.

Not until last fall's elections brought Greece's socialist opposition to power did new data arrive from Athens -- and new questions and accusations from Brussels.

The Greek parliament and government are now virtually stripped of power. They're not allowed to decide on any new expenditures without EU approval. Finance Minister Giorgos Papakonstantinou is required to report every four weeks on progress made in budget restructuring.

An EU Protectorate

Brussels, not Athens, now controls whether and how the austerity program takes effect. If "detailed and ongoing inspection" shows that the actual results fall short of those predicted, Almunia says, then Brussels' watchdogs will demand additional measures. There were even calls at the European Parliament last week to send a special EU representative with extensive authority to Greece. The small country has become little more than an EU protectorate.

The EU Commission and the euro-zone leaders hope these compulsory measures will steady markets. They also hope Greek unions and associations, from farmers to taxi drivers, won't mobilize against the reduction in the country's standard of living that will accompany these new measures.

German Finance Minister Schäuble and German Federal Bank President Axel Weber rule out giving aid to the struggling country. Indeed, EU treaties strictly forbid any such aid. The message is that Greece must help itself.

As a precautionary measure, though, both German officials, along with their colleagues in other EU countries, are keeping open the possibility of lending a hand anyway. The EU can't afford for a member state to go bankrupt, either politically or economically.

Out of the Question

The experts always debate the same possibilities. The first would be a common euro-zone bond, which would be placed at Greece's disposal. The advantages for Greece are obvious -- the country would receive funds more cheaply than it currently does because the euro zone as a whole wouldn't have to pay as high a risk premium as Greece alone does. The disadvantage is that countries with good credit, like Germany, would have to pay higher interest rates. Consequently, the German government insists that such a loan is out of the question.

An alternative would be bilateral financial aid. Solvent countries, such as Germany, would take out loans on the financial market at good rates and pass these on to Greece. But euro-zone governments are also reluctant to take this path.

The last option is the International Monetary Fund (IMF), which could use its resources to help Greece out of its credit crunch. It would likely impose much stricter conditions on its aid money than the EU would. But the IMF's involvement would also mean a loss of face for the entire euro zone and a triumph for the Washington-based institution, which was always skeptical of the euro.

If Greece doesn't stabilize in the coming weeks, the euro-zone's leaders will be left facing a choice between a rock and a hard place, with the third option being even worse.

Translated from the German by Ella Ornstein

Article...
Comments
Discuss this issue with other readers!
8 total posts
Show all comments
Page 1
tsangpakho 02/09/2010
1. Ironic similarity between China-US and EU rich-poor
If one substitute China for Germany and US for Greece, Spain, Portugal and Ireland in this article, one can see the similar underlying problem (fixed currency exchange rate, living beyond one's means, artificially low exchange rate ... etc)and the common pattern of defensive behaviour, including finger pointing.
andrewpurdy 02/10/2010
2. No bailout needed
There is no reason for the EU to bail out Greece. Just let them default. Some investors and speculators will lose some money. So what. The Euro won't collapse any more than the dollar will collapse when California defaults. However, the EU will probably have to readjust its internal governance. They will have to change the constitution to fully federalize the EU, and give the central government the needed fiscal and taxation powers that it currently lacks. The EU will have to become more like the US.
akaghzi 02/10/2010
3. Political union
Economic union with out political union is not a practical solution, the current status of EU parliament must wield more political and policy making power than it currently has, more in line with confederation probably following Canadian model. All crisis present opportunities and more severe crisis bring to table a greater opportunity, I am not a proponent of shock therapy like Friedman, the current fiscal crisis in Greece and potentially in Spain, Portugal and Ireland is in my opinion is one of them. Instead of ECB bureaucracy I believe EU Parliament can and should address the issue and bring about a fundamental change, in terms of overall fiscal policy, transparency in statistics gathering and reporting, regulatory reforms of various markets specially financial markets. I have been reading about Greek fiscal issue for few weeks now, the speculators have literally put tens of billions of dollars in bets against Euro against its counterparts citing weakness in above mentioned countries' governments' balance sheets, making even harder and costlier for these governments to act in balanced fashion. I believe people of EU need to address this issue more seriously than rallying against state bailout of private financial institutions, because this centrifugal development of member states will eventually break the economic union, and a believer in butterfly effect I think that time of acting of making EU parliament more effective politically is now.
Teaser38 02/10/2010
4. Not similar at all...
Zitat von tsangpakhoIf one substitute China for Germany and US for Greece, Spain, Portugal and Ireland in this article, one can see the similar underlying problem (fixed currency exchange rate, living beyond one's means, artificially low exchange rate ... etc)and the common pattern of defensive behaviour, including finger pointing.
This is nothing like the US-China relationship. First, China can simply divest itself of US dollars and stop buying US treasuries. Or the US could just print money and inflate itself out of its debt (or default). Germany is stuck with Greece in a currency union. It isn't that Germany is a major of creditor of Greece, but it is that Greece cannot print money. Greece cannot default like Argentina did in '02 and not cause a panic in the rest of the EU and cause the other PIIGS to default as well.
symewinston 02/10/2010
5.
Zitat von Teaser38This is nothing like the US-China relationship. First, China can simply divest itself of US dollars and stop buying US treasuries. Or the US could just print money and inflate itself out of its debt (or default). Germany is stuck with Greece in a currency union. It isn't that Germany is a major of creditor of Greece, but it is that Greece cannot print money. Greece cannot default like Argentina did in '02 and not cause a panic in the rest of the EU and cause the other PIIGS to default as well.
China is not stupid, to bankrupt its main trading partner would mean bankrupting itself.
Show all comments
Page 1

© SPIEGEL ONLINE 2010
All Rights Reserved
Reproduction only allowed with the permission of SPIEGELnet GmbH


Die Homepage wurde aktualisiert. Jetzt aufrufen.
Hinweis nicht mehr anzeigen.