Intelligence Report: Number of Islamists in Germany Grows

In its annual report on extremist activity in Germany, the country's domestic intelligence agency has identified a surge in support for Islamists and growth in the number of influential neo-Nazi music groups.

Salafist supporters participate in a protest in Cologne in 2012. Zoom
DPA

Salafist supporters participate in a protest in Cologne in 2012.

During the past year, Islamist organizations experienced a surge in support in Germany according to an annual report from the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution obtained by SPIEGEL in advance of its planned public release on Tuesday.

The report states that the number of members and supporters of groups like Milli Görüs, the largest Islamist organization in the country, or Hezbollah in Germany rose from 38,080 in 2011 to 42,550 last year.

The largest growth was seen among members and supporters of Salafists, which increased from 3,800 to 4,500, the government agency stated. Last year, German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich of the conservative Christian Social Union moved to ban three Salafist groups.

The Office for the Protection of the Constitution, the domestic intelligence agency responsible for monitoring extremism, observed varying trends among far-right groups in the country. The National Democratic Party (NPD), a political party that holds seats in parliament in the states of Saxony and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and is identified by the intelligence agency as a far-right and xenophobic group, saw its membership decline to 6,000 members.

The regional governments of Germany's 16 federal states are planning a legal motion to get the party banned. But the complexity of the case, which would be heard by the Federal Constitutional Court, has delayed the process. The motion may not be filed before the September general election.

The agency found that neo-Nazi bands still play an important role in the far-right scene. In 2012, the agency identified 182 active right-wing extremist music groups, four more than in the previous year. However, the agency found that they had held significantly fewer concerts than in the previous year.

dsl/SPIEGEL

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1. Security
thorpeman@sky.com 06/10/2013
You can't complain about systems like PRISM & Islamist threats in the same breath
2. And you worry about the Right?
SStrengari 06/12/2013
I lived in Germany for years; they have truly had a momentous break from their past (I would argue that perhaps they threw the baby out with the bathwater when trying to discard their connections with Nazism because they turned their backs on their ENTIRE past). But it is amazing to see modern Germany contort itself to distance itself with anything that is traditional, right wing (the Nazis cannot claim the entire right for themselves), and things distinctly German because they fear being labeled "NSDAP". Yet in the mean time they are enabling their demise with a large non-German population that never integrated and nor cares to. They refuse to acknowledge this catastrophe and in fact trip over themselves helping the very people who will see Germany cease to exist. Rather than say it in German because the NSDAP hijacked the phrase, let me say it in English..... GERMANY WAKE UP! You were the cornerstone of European and Western civilization. If you do not address this soon you will become a part of Eurabia!
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