Continent at War The Front Lines of WWI


NAVAL BLOCKADE

The British naval blockade inflicted lasting damage on the economies of the Central Powers. In Germany alone, some 800,000 people died as a result of malnutrition.
WAR AT SEA

The Battle of Jutland between the British and the Germans, involving some 250 warships, was the biggest naval battle of the war. It ended without a clear victor. The Germans did not try to break the naval blockade thereafter.
WESTERN FRONT

The Schlieffen Plan called for defeating France in a rapid offensive. But the attack failed at the gates of Paris. The bitter and deadly trench warfare which resulted became the symbol of World War I.
EASTERN FRONT

Initially, Russian troops invaded East Prussia, but were forced to retreat following their defeat at Tannenberg.

In Galicia, the Austro-Hungarian Empire faced a defeat which could only be avoided by a German attack, which took the pressure off of their allies.

In 1917, Russia withdrew from the war. During the peace talks of Brest-Litovsk, German units occupied large areas previously controlled by Russia.
BALKAN WAR

After Bulgaria joined the war on the side of the Central Powers, the country was on the brink of controlling the Balkans in 1915. Their advance was only halted when the Entente landed in Greece and went on the attack.
ALPS

Italy joined the Entente in 1915. Italian troops battles Austro-Hungarian soldiers even high up in the Alps. Losses on both sides were extremely high.
GALLIPOLI

The Ottoman Empire declared war on the Entente Powers at the end of 1914 and was able to successfully defend the Gallipoli Peninsula from an Entente invasion. Historians estimate the total losses on both sides as a result of the battle at 500,000 soldiers. Australia and New Zealand still commemorate the battle today.

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