Interview with Tunisia's Prime Minister 'Military Intervention in Syria Would Be Pure Madness'

Ahead of a meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Berlin on Wednesday, Tunisian Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali has warned against military intervention in Syria. In an interview with SPIEGEL ONLINE, Jebali also rejects the prospect of Syrian President Assad being exiled to his country.

Rebels in northern Syria, where the situation continues to deteriorate this week: "We cannot and will not accept a regime that systematically murders its own people."
AP

Rebels in northern Syria, where the situation continues to deteriorate this week: "We cannot and will not accept a regime that systematically murders its own people."


The bloodshed continues in Syria, despite international appeals and stronger sanctions from the West. United Nations envoy Kofi Annan also failed to persuade Syrian President Bashar Assad to end his brutal campaign against his own people. The UN estimates that some 8,000 people have already been killed in the conflict.

As the diplomatic gridlock continues, calls for decisive steps by the West are growing louder. Early on Tuesday morning, the Syrian opposition called for military intervention by the Arab states and the international community. However, the United States, France and others have refused, not least because Russia and China vehemently oppose an intervention in the country.

But they aren't the only nations with misgivings about military intervention. SPIEGEL ONLINE spoke with Tunisian Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali about staying out of Syria, the Arab Revolution and its possible failure, his country's progress and whether Syrian dictator Assad could be exiled to Tunisia.


SPIEGEL ONLINE: Mr. Prime Minister, about a year ago the Arab Spring began here in Tunisia. Following the celebrations after the fall of several dictators, the situation now looks grim. Libya threatens to drift apart, the democratic process has stalled in Egypt, and in Syria, Bashar Assad's regime still clings to power. Do you think this historic change will fail?

Jebali: You're painting a picture of the situation which is too dark. The upheaval in the Arab world was a historic moment and isn't yet over. We're in the middle of a difficult process. The most important thing, however, is that the revolution in North Africa isn't allowed to be turned back.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: Many people say that the revolutions just didn't go far enough. Instead of completely dissolving old power structures, only the top players in despotic systems were removed.

Jebali: That way of thinking assumes that revolutions must follow the same pattern -- more or less like the French or October Revolutions, with lots of bloodshed, endless rage and thousands of dead. I don't share this view. The world has developed past this and the dictators are different, as are the people who rise up against them.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: The Tunisian people have been protesting a lot lately; almost daily, groups protest unemployment and the poor economic situation. They are against your policies, not against a despot.

Jebali: I would be a fool if I denied the immense economic problems in our country. In addition to the political oppression and mismanagement, this was a main motivation for the revolution. We'll need many years to overcome the inequality between different regions and social strata. Until then, everyone has the right to hold us accountable for our failures.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: That sounds good in theory, but at some point you, too, will be driven out by the angry masses.

Jebali: Every government would have these problems. What's new is that every citizen can express their feelings on the street. At the political level, we have achieved a lot: free elections, pluralism and democracy. The point now is to use this political success to solve economic problems.

'Tunisia is More Secure Today'

SPIEGEL ONLINE: A central factor in the Tunisian economy is tourism. Your main customers, vacationers from Europe, are still avoiding the country because it is not yet safe enough.

Jebali: This image of Tunisia is distorted. When you look at the Tunisian press, you get the feeling that we're living in the middle of a civil war. Of course I don't want to dispute that, every day, there are demonstrations, sit-ins and protests at the universities. But do you have the feeling that your life is in danger here?

SPIEGEL ONLINE: Our feeling is more that you are in danger. Your seat of government is guarded like a fortress, and every ministry is still surrounded by barbed wire. It's not particularly reassuring for tourists.

Jebali: There is a police presence, and it is still necessary. But even in the year of the revolution not a single incident involving tourists was registered. I assure every tourist from Germany that Tunisia is safer today that it was earlier.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: This week you are visiting Berlin to meet with the German government. What would you like to see from Berlin?

Jebali: Germany has already helped us a lot, and we are thankful for the support. Right at the beginning the government gave us a hand with debt relief. I will travel to Berlin to underscore how important the democratic process is for Tunisia, and that we need help.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: In Germany there is a sense, however, that an Islamization of society and intolerance is growing in Tunisia.

Jebali: I can understand that the Islamists' victory in the election must've been a shock for observers on the outside, but what happened afterwards? We in the Ennahda Party sought out the middle ground and built a broad coalition. I am certain that Tunisian society will find its way to tolerance through this balance. This will also have a positive effect on developments in the neighboring countries.

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ioanonimus 03/14/2012
1.
Zitat von sysopAPAhead of a meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Berlin on Wednesday, Tunisian Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali has warned against military intervention in Syria. In an interview with SPIEGEL ONLINE, Jebali also rejects the prospect of Syrian President Assad being exiled to his country. http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,821144,00.html
Nothing about Bahrain, about Saudi tanks crushing the demonstrations there. Nothing about Yemen where more people have been killed than in Syria. Nothing. Nothing about Saudi bloody dictatorship, the worst in the world. The question above shows how much professional deontology have these two reporters, Matthias Gebauer and Christoph Sydow. They have none. Instead of doing a proper interview they only followed some given scripts like puppets in the strings of their masters. Next article will be to prize the Saudi “democracy” our main ally in the Arab Middle East. No dictators will be ashamed to have journalists like these two ones writing in their papers. Nobody seems to care that we are allied with the worst dictators in the world to overthrow the only secular regimes in the Muslim world and replace them with religious fanatics to please our “friends” the Saudis.
nevermind 03/16/2012
2. disappearing narrative
More people died through the illegal bombing of Sirte at the fag end of the war upon Libya, than in Homs. That is precisely the reasons why Russia and China vetoed more of the same and rightly so. That said, what ever happened and who knows were Adam Werritty is? The grand wizard of british foreign politics with exceptional access to private secretaries, the MOD, and his visists to Israel, his frinedship and meetings with now ambassador Gould, his high level foreign visits with best man Liam FoxMP, all these questions need answering. This man has brokered arms and war in the ME, so where is he? Another man is looking for him, he who most courageously defied his own Government, who was dumped from a lifelong diplomatic career, because he spoke out against torture worldwide, have a listen to what he has to say about the ever dwindling narratives, control over media assets, and whether our Governments really care about humnan rights. This is a lecture to the ICD in Berlin, please note that 20 minutes of the original have mysteriously disappeared. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUZTiAoaax4
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