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Victims of Radical Islam: Christianity's Modern-Day Martyrs

The rise of Islamic extremism is putting increasing pressure on Christians in Muslim countries, who are the victims of murder, violence and discrimination. Christians are now considered the most persecuted religious group around the world. Paradoxically, their greatest hope could come from moderate political Islam. By SPIEGEL staff.

Kevin Ang is cautious these days. He glances around, taking a look to the left down the long row of stores, then to the right toward the square, to check that no one is nearby. Only then does the church caretaker dig out his key, unlock the gate, and enter the Metro Tabernacle Church in a suburb of Kuala Lumpur.

The draft of air stirs charred Bible pages. The walls are sooty and the building smells of scorched plastic. Metro Tabernacle Church was the first of 11 churches set on fire by angry Muslims -- all because of one word. "Allah," Kevin Ang whispers.

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Photo Gallery: Dying for Their Faith

It began with a question -- should Christians here, like Muslims, be allowed to call their god "Allah," since they don't have any other word or language at their disposal? The Muslims claim Allah for themselves, both the word and the god, and fear that if Christians are allowed to use the same word for their own god, it could lead pious Muslims astray.

For three years there was a ban in place and the government confiscated Bibles that mentioned "Allah." Then on Dec. 31 last year, Malaysia's highest court reached a decision: The Christian God could also be called Allah.

Imams protested and disgruntled citizens threw Molotov cocktails at churches. Then, on top of everything, Prime Minister Najib Razak stated that he couldn't stop people who might protest against specific developments in the country -- and some took that as an invitation to violent action. First churches burned, then the other side retaliated with pigs' heads placed in front of two mosques. Sixty percent of Malaysians are Muslims and 9 percent Christians, with the rest made up by Hindus, Buddhists, and Sikhs. They managed to live together well, until now.

It's a battle over a single word, but it's also about much more than that. The conflict has to do with the question of what rights the Christian minority in Malaysia is entitled to. Even more than that, it's a question of politics. The ruling United Malays National Organization is losing supporters to Islamist hardliners -- and wants to win them back with religious policies.

Those policies are receiving a receptive welcome. Some of Malaysia's states interpret Sharia, the Islamic system of law and order, particularly strictly. The once liberal country is on the way to giving up freedom of religion -- and what constitutes order is being defined ever more rigidly. If a Muslim woman drinks beer, she can be punished with six cane strokes. Some regions similarly forbid such things as brightly colored lipstick, thick make-up, or shoes with clattering high heels.

Expelled, Abducted and Murdered

Not only in Malaysia, but in many countries through the Muslim world, religion has gained influence over governmental policy in the last two decades. The militant Islamist group Hamas controls the Gaza Strip, while Islamist militias are fighting the governments of Nigeria and the Philippines. Somalia, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Yemen have fallen to a large extent into the hands of Islamists. And where Islamists are not yet in power, secular governing parties are trying to outstrip the more religious groups in a rush to the right.

This can be seen in Egypt, Algeria, Sudan, Indonesia to some extent, and also Malaysia. Even though this Islamization often has more to do with politics than with religion, and even though it doesn't necessarily lead to the persecution of Christians, it can still be said that where Islam gains importance, freedoms for members of other faiths shrink.

There are 2.2 billion Christians around the world. The Christian non-governmental organization Open Doors calculates that 100 million of them are being threatened or persecuted. They aren't allowed to build churches, buy Bibles or obtain jobs. That's the more harmless form of discrimination and it affects the majority of these 100 million Christians. The more brutal version sees them blackmailed, robbed, expelled, abducted or even murdered.

Bishop Margot Kässmann, who was head of the Protestant Church in Germany before stepping down on Feb. 24, believes Christians are "the most frequently persecuted religious group globally." Germany's 22 regional churches have proclaimed this coming Sunday to be the first commemoration day for persecuted Christians. Kässmann said she wanted to show solidarity with fellow Christians who "have great difficulty living out their beliefs freely in countries such as Indonesia, India, Iraq or Turkey."

There are counterexamples as well, of course. In Lebanon and Syria, Christians are not discriminated against, and in fact play an important role in politics and society. And the persecution of Christian is by no means the domain of fanatical Muslims alone -- Christians are also imprisoned, abused and murdered in countries such as Laos, Vietnam, China and Eritrea.

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1. New Crusade & Creeping Genocide
arazs 02/26/2010
What happens now in the world looks like creeping crusade against muslims rather than creeping genocide of christians.
2.
prophetofdoom 02/27/2010
The history of life is largely about competition for territory, resources and quality of life. Human history is largely about the growth of knowledge and skills, the expansion of human settlement and wars fought for control of desirable territory, natural resources and quality of life. Human conduct is governed by human knowledge, abilities, attitudes, values and beliefs. Belief systems compete to govern human conduct and human destiny. Ultimately, the most appropriate belief system will emerge to govern human conduct. The "People of the Book" have one thing in common - a book setting out variations of a belief system that is largely discreditied by modern science. All Abrahamic belief systems are anachronistic and redundant. Wars can not end in the near future because the human population has grown exponentially in recent centuries and has reached an unsustainable level. We must compete for the control of limited productive territory and resources. War is nature's way to eliminate the anachronistic and redundant.
3. Allah = God
bernd_muc 02/27/2010
---Quote--- The Muslims claim Allah for themselves, both the word and the god ---End Quote--- Christians, Jews, and Muslims pray to the same God; Jesus is mentioned as a prophet in the Koran. Obviously those fundamentalist Muslims don't know or - probably - don't want to know this. So if the word for "the one God" is "Allah" in Arab, it belongs to any monotheistic religion when you talk about it in Arab. But as long Muslims kill Muslims in Iraq or elsewhere, why shouldn't they also kill Christians? It's obviously not about religion but just power (as always).
4. We should be ashamed for stopping critisizing
Arne 02/28/2010
Zitat von sysopThe rise of Islamic extremism is putting increasing pressure on Christians in Muslim countries, who are the victims of murder, violence and discrimination. Christians are now considered the most persecuted religious group around the world. Paradoxically, their greatest hope could come from moderate political Islam. By SPIEGEL staff. http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,680349,00.html
We have to be ashamed of ourselves for refraining from critizising persecution of Christians. And I have to suspect this happened for purely economic reasons. This has to end. And the Spiegel took a good first step since we even stopped to discuss the topic altogether. There were some large demonstrations by Kopts in Dusseldorf and Stuttgart which sadly didn't make the headlines as well. We are chained by our economical dependence on oil from countries like Saudi Arabia and in exchange we simply stopped to critizise the lack of religious and social freedom and their export of Wahabism. We have to find means to become independent of oil - but as soon as somebody would build an electric car OPEC would simply lower the oil price to 0. Bye, Arne
5.
symewinston 02/28/2010
Zitat von sysopThe rise of Islamic extremism is putting increasing pressure on Christians in Muslim countries, who are the victims of murder, violence and discrimination. Christians are now considered the most persecuted religious group around the world. Paradoxically, their greatest hope could come from moderate political Islam. By SPIEGEL staff. http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,680349,00.html
and here in Australia the politically correct mob order us to be tolerant of the intolerant. One day we will wake up to learn that Sharia law is the law of this land, the way things are going.
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Graphic: The countries where Christians are most persecuted Zoom
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Graphic: The countries where Christians are most persecuted



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