Photo Gallery Berlin's Abandoned Spreepark

With its overgrown roller coasters and a ferris wheel turning idly in the wind, a defunct old East German amusement park in Berlin fascinates locals and tourists alike. While there have been repeated attempts to open the Spreepark once again, administrative chaos and incompetence have repeatedly blocked such efforts.
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For more than a decade, East Berlin's famous Spreepark has been closed to the public. In 2002, the park was declared insolvent.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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The park still retains some of its original features, but many of the installations have been sold off by those managing the insolvency.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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Despite its sad demise, the park retains a certain charm. Pictured here is a teacup carousel dating back to the communist era.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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After reunification, the asphalted surface around the park's famous ferris wheel was converted into a water landscape. Roller coasters, two water courses and a Western town were also added to the park.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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For several years now, visitors have been able to get to know the defunct fairground through a series of guided tours.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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Former owner Norbert Witte shipped six of Spreepark's main attractions to Peru in 2002. The transport had been ratified by the authorities, who believed the installations were being sent for repair.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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What used to be a picturesque swan lake is now covered in algae.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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The park also included a series of canoes which could be taken out by visitors.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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One of the park's miniature railways is back in working order and carries visitors across the site on weekends.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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Spreepark was once known for its spectacular shows. Famously, polar bear trainer Ursula Böttcher performed here in the 1990s.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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The rusty roller coaster has been out of order for over a decade.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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The park is deemed a safety hazard by the authorities, with some of the wooden installations threatening to collapse.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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In 2011, a scene for the action film "Hanna" was filmed at the park. The site has also served as a backdrop for music videos and a German vampire movie.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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The Spreepark features several defunct railway routes, which visitors once used to navigate the site.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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Earlier this year, the band The XX played a gig at Spreepark. The organizers of the event subsequently tried to acquire the site, but were unsuccessful.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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Every year, some 500 people break into the park. They often take parts of the props with them as souvenirs.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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The Spreepark's famous swan boats -- now covered in graffiti -- are dotted around the site.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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What used to be a kiosk selling condiments to visitors is now being used as a dumpster.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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The site features the remains of half-timber houses which once accomodated a ghost train and a hall of mirrors.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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The park's ferris wheel is out of service, but still turns with the wind. Visitors illegally climbing on it have been known to get caught at the top when the wind stopped blowing.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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Access to the park is limited: The closest train station is a 15-minute walk away and there are few parking spaces.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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The park's future is uncertain, but the site will remain one of the German capital's edgiest attractions.

Foto: Clara Fohrbeck
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