Photo Gallery A Visit to a Dying City

Aleppo has been split in half by Syria's ongoing civil war and violence there continues. Most in the rebel half prefer to live near the front lines so as to avoid the barrel bombs dropped deeper into eastern Aleppo. When death rains from the sky, there is no time to take shelter.
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Aleppo has been split in half by Syria's ongoing civil war and violence there continues. Most in the rebel half prefer to live near the front lines so as to avoid the barrel bombs dropped deeper into eastern Aleppo.

Foto: Jawad Qurabi/ DER SPIEGEL
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A market in eastern Aleppo. Many who have remained in the city have surrendered themselves to fate. It makes no sense to flee, they say. When it is time to die, death will find them, they believe.

Foto: Jawad Qurabi/ DER SPIEGEL
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Huge swaths of Aleppo are unliveable, with residential buildings either blasted to the ground or heavily damaged.

Foto: Jawad Qurabi/ DER SPIEGEL
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Even though the majority of the population has vacated the east, there are still 2.2 million people living in the western half of Aleppo.

Foto: Jawad Qurabi/ DER SPIEGEL
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The systematic bombing of eastern Aleppo by regime troops began in late 2013. Since then, 2,500 people have been killed in the explosions.

Foto: Jawad Qurabi/ DER SPIEGEL
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A typical street scene in Aleppo. The front lines in the city are no longer the scene of intense fighting, as the focus of the battle has moved elsewhere. But the city remains divided and death commonplace.

Foto: Jawad Qurabi/ DER SPIEGEL
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Magi Anastos, 80, is one of the seven residents who remain in the Catholic retirement home Maison de Repos Saint-Elie. Residents there used to know the local government sniper, but there is now a new one and they are worried.

Foto: Jawad Qurabi/ DER SPIEGEL
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The papermaker Rahmu Abdullah, 77, is the last one left in his street. He spends his days reading and teaching songs to his zebra finch.

Foto: Jawad Qurabi/ DER SPIEGEL
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A destroyed house in Aleppo. There are bus trips from one half of the city to the other, but they take 12 hours and travel through much of northern Syria.

Foto: Jawad Qurabi/ DER SPIEGEL
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A street scene in Aleppo. Rarely does anyone express animosity toward the other half of the city. The local rebel commander says he and his men are fighting the regime, not the people in the western half of the city.

Foto: Jawad Qurabi/ DER SPIEGEL
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A group of boys in eastern Aleppo. Those who could leave have long since departed.

Foto: Jawad Qurabi/ DER SPIEGEL
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Survival is not easy in eastern Aleppo. But many of the rebel-held districts have power 24-hours a day.

Foto: Jawad Qurabi/ DER SPIEGEL
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Most shops in eastern Aleppo are closed or have been destroyed. Oddly though, there are several pet shops still doing business.

Foto: Jawad Qurabi/ DER SPIEGEL
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