Photo Gallery Goodbye to Afghanistan

NATO forces are due to leave Afghanistan by the end of 2014, but the withdrawal poses a massive logistical challenge. The US and its allies are dependent on air hubs in Russia and authoritarian Central Asian republics to transport its troops and equipment home -- and getting those countries to play along is not always easy.
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NATO forces are due to leave Afghanistan by the end of 2014, but the withdrawal poses a massive logistical challenge. Here, US soldiers returning home from Afghanistan wait in line at the air hub near Bishkek in Kyrgyzstan (August 2011 photo).

Foto: dapd
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Some 130,000 NATO soldiers must leave Afghanistan within two years, together with at least 70,000 vehicles and 120,000 containers. Here, US Marines in Helmand province.

Foto: DMITRY KOSTYUKOV/ AFP
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Bundeswehr soldiers near Baglan. Germany's military will be bringing back more than 1,700 vehicles, howitzers and tanks.

Foto: dapd
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After being in Afghanistan for over a decade, NATO can hardly wait to leave the region.

Foto: PATRICK BAZ/ AFP
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The Soviets lost 15,000 men during their Afghanistan adventure, and their 1989 withdrawal also ended in chaos (1988 photo).

Foto: dpa Picture-Alliance / Tass/ picture-alliance / dpa
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Graphic: Air hubs used by the Bundeswehr and the US Army

Foto: DER SPIEGEL
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