Photo Gallery Riots in Athens

Protests against tough austerity measures continued across Greece over the weekend. On Saturday, left-wing radicals took to the streets in Athens and clashed with riot police in a fiery battle.
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Fighting among flames: Demonstrators in Athens battled police and members of the media with Molotov cocktails on May 1.

Foto: Orestis Panagiotou/ dpa
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The rioters wanted to show their resentment towards the austerity measures imposed by the EU on Greece, which Athens agreed to in order to qualify for a €110-billion financial bailout from the EU and the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

Foto: Milos Bicanski/ Getty Images
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Euro-zone members will contribute €80 billion to the Greek bailout. Here, a man runs from a gas bomb set off in a street.

Foto: JOHN KOLESIDIS/ REUTERS
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Once again, Greeks and police square off. Many of the protesters claim that the EU-imposed austerity measures will only hurt the poor -- Greek Prime Minister Georgios Papandreou said that the measures were necessary to "save the fatherland."

Foto: THANASSIS STAVRAKIS/ AP
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Police try to escape a gas bomb on May 1. Greeks coupled their frustration with the May Day holiday, which is a traditional holiday of the international workers' movement.

Foto: JOHN KOLESIDIS/ REUTERS
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Left-wing radicals threw stones and Molotov cocktails at police during May 1 demonstrations. According to the terms of the EU-IMF bailout, public sector salaries and pensions will be frozen for a minimum of three years.

Foto: Orestis Panagiotou/ dpa
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The government will also have to raise the value-added tax to 23 percent, a 2 percent increase. No TV: Rioters set fire to broadcast television van.

Foto: JOHN KOLESIDIS/ REUTERS
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Along with freezing public workers' salaries, the government will also increase taxes on fuel, tobacco and alcohol by 10 percent. On Saturday, police released tear gas to disperse demonstrators and protect journalists.

Foto: Milos Bicanski/ Getty Images
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Greek police are set on fire by fire bombs hurled by protesters. Despite the bailout, Greece's debt is expect to rise over the next three years to 149 percent of GDP in 2013.

Foto: Evi Zoupanou/ AP
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The riots broke out following a peaceful protests in Athens. Here, a woman is led away by police in handcuffs.

Foto: JOHN KOLESIDIS/ REUTERS
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Greece will receive the first installment (€30 billion) of the bailout within the next two weeks and a total of €45 billion in 2010.

Foto: Kostas Tsironis/ AP
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Germany will commit €8.2 billion in 2010 and €22 billion over the three-year financial aid package. Protesters confront riot police on Saturday.

Foto: ICON/ REUTERS
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Fire alarm: One Greek police officer struggles to put out the flames caused by a gas bomb. German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble said, "it is our mission to defend the stability of the euro zone in its entirety."

Foto: Evi Zoupanou/ AP
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