Photo Gallery The Cologne Conflagration

The riots in Cologne at the end of December show that there is a new danger on Germany's extremist right. Neo-Nazis and football hooligans have teamed up to go after Islamist Salafists. Many are wondering why officials didn't recognize the development sooner.
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The riots in Cologne at the end of October show that there is a new danger on Germany's extremist right. Neo-Nazis and football hooligans have teamed up to go after Islamist Salafists. Many are wondering why officials didn't recognize the development sooner.

Foto: Thilo Schmülgen/ dpa
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"We Are Fighting to Win." Some 4,800 demonstrators, hooligans and right-wing extremists took part in the Cologne march on October 26. Only 1,300 police were on hand to control them.

Foto: WOLFGANG RATTAY/ REUTERS
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By the end of the march, 49 police officers had been injured, a police van had been flipped over and plenty of other property had been damaged. Cologne police quickly assembled a special investigative unit made up of 36 officers. State prosecutors say that 32 suspects have now been identified and fully 72 investigations have been opened.

Foto: Thilo Schmülgen/ dpa
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Protestors gesturing toward members of the media in Cologne. The march revealed an unholy alliance between violent football hooligan groups and right-wing extremists.

Foto: WOLFGANG RATTAY/ REUTERS
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Demonstrators with a banner reading "Hooligans Gegen Salafisten." With more than 3,000 members, the network is a loose association of neo-Nazis, nationalists and football rowdies.

Foto: Caroline Seidel/ dpa
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The group also sells T-shirts. But its leadership has been keeping a low profile since the Cologne rally.

Foto: Caroline Seidel/ dpa
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“The situation was very clearly underestimated,” says André Schulz, head of the police association BDK. Ralf Jäger, interior minister of North Rhine-Westphalia, disagrees, though he does admit that the vast majority of those attending the demonstration were unknown to security officials.

Foto: WOLFGANG RATTAY/ REUTERS
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Police officers arrest a demonstrator during the march in Cologne. A special police task force has been formed to investigate what went wrong in the city and to find out more about Hogesa.

Foto: WOLFGANG RATTAY/ REUTERS
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The Salafists have thus far remained quiet in the face of the new threat from the right. But some officials worry that it won't always be so. And if the Salafists begin to retaliate, more violence could be on the way.

Foto: WOLFGANG RATTAY/ REUTERS
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A parliamentary inquiry made earlier this year by the Left Party made it clear that officials knew very little about the hooligan-neo-Nazi alliance.

Foto: Caroline Seidel/ dpa
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