The Future of Electric Tesla Joins the Race for the Next-Gen Battery

China, Japan and South Korea have long been in the lead when it comes to car battery technology. With new technologies and better production methods, Tesla now wants to change that. Germany is falling behind.
Tesla technicians in the company's Gigafactory in Nevada with a battery for the Model 3

Tesla technicians in the company's Gigafactory in Nevada with a battery for the Model 3

Foto: Benjamin Spillman / The Reno Gazette-Journal / AP / picture alliance / AP
Tesla presentation on "Battery Day" 2020: "We're putting so much effort into making cells and kind of trying to reinvent every aspect of cell production."

Tesla presentation on "Battery Day" 2020: "We're putting so much effort into making cells and kind of trying to reinvent every aspect of cell production."

Foto: Tesla / youtube
DER SPIEGEL 40/2020
The battery research center at the University of Münster: "We are looking for the all-rounder."

The battery research center at the University of Münster: "We are looking for the all-rounder."

Foto: Lars Berg / DER SPIEGEL
Elon Musk during a visit to the construction site of the Tesla factory near Berlin

Elon Musk during a visit to the construction site of the Tesla factory near Berlin

Foto: ODD ANDERSEN / AFP
"There would no longer be any reason to buy an internal combustion vehicle – not even the price."

Maximilian Fichtner from the Helmholtz Institute Ulm

A lithium-ion battery at the battery research center in Münster: Just 5 percent of lithium used in batteries is currently recycled.

A lithium-ion battery at the battery research center in Münster: Just 5 percent of lithium used in batteries is currently recycled.

Foto: Lars Berg / DER SPIEGEL
"It does stand out that when it comes to mobility, we in Germany have done all we can to prolong the lifespans of old technologies."

Martin Winter, head of the battery research center MEET at the University of Münster

Battery researchers in Münster: "If Germany only corners 5 to 10 percent of the expected giga-market, it would be a gigantic success."

Battery researchers in Münster: "If Germany only corners 5 to 10 percent of the expected giga-market, it would be a gigantic success."

Foto: Lars Berg / DER SPIEGEL