The Victory of Rage AfD Sets its Sights on German Parliament

Even as Chancellor Angela Merkel seems set to win her fourth term, the German campaign has been characterized in some towns by rage and hatred. The right-wing populist AfD is also expecting Election Day success, and it will change German political debate. By DER SPIEGEL Staff
Anti-Merkel protesters at a campaign event in Torgau on Sept. 6.

Anti-Merkel protesters at a campaign event in Torgau on Sept. 6.

Foto: Hermann Bredehorst/ DER SPIEGEL
A vandalized campaign poster for SPD chancellor candidate Martin Schulz: An extremely vocal minority feels neither represented by Merkel nor Schulz.

A vandalized campaign poster for SPD chancellor candidate Martin Schulz: An extremely vocal minority feels neither represented by Merkel nor Schulz.

Foto: Sean Gallup/ Getty Images
Sandro Oschkinat speaking into his megaphone on the central square of Torgau. He says it was the first protest he ever registered in his life.

Sandro Oschkinat speaking into his megaphone on the central square of Torgau. He says it was the first protest he ever registered in his life.

Foto: Hermann Bredehorst / DER SPIEGEL
AfD lead candidates Alice Weidel (left) and Alexander Gauland together with Erika Steinbach, an erstwhile Christian Democrat parliamentarian who is now supporting the AfD.

AfD lead candidates Alice Weidel (left) and Alexander Gauland together with Erika Steinbach, an erstwhile Christian Democrat parliamentarian who is now supporting the AfD.

Foto: Bert Bostelmann / DER SPIEGEL
"Love of your homeland isn't a crime" and "We've had enough!" An anti-Merkel protest in Finsterwalde in September.

"Love of your homeland isn't a crime" and "We've had enough!" An anti-Merkel protest in Finsterwalde in September.

Foto: Hermann Bredehorst / DER SPIEGEL
Protesters in Berlin march with a banner reading: "Merkel must go!"

Protesters in Berlin march with a banner reading: "Merkel must go!"

Foto: Carsten Koall/ Getty Images