Eternal Poison Vietnam's Ongoing Fight Against Agent Orange

Hundreds of thousands of Vietnamese suffer from gene mutations resulting from the Americans' use of Agent Orange during the war. Birth defects are still a regular occurrence. Now, 44 years later, the U.S. has suddenly pledged more aid.
Nguyen Van Bat with his wife, two daughters and two grandchildren

Nguyen Van Bat with his wife, two daughters and two grandchildren

Foto: HAI THANH/ SPIEGEL ONLINE
Foto: DER SPIEGEL
Photo Gallery: Living with the Scourge of Agent Orange
Foto: HAI THANH/ SPIEGEL ONLINE
Fotostrecke

Photo Gallery: Living with the Scourge of Agent Orange

Nguyen Kien in his Moon MN 089 preparing for the upcoming race.

Nguyen Kien in his Moon MN 089 preparing for the upcoming race.

Foto: HAI THANH/ SPIEGEL ONLINE
Nguyen Kien had an operation to straighten his legs when he was a boy, but it was unsuccessful.

Nguyen Kien had an operation to straighten his legs when he was a boy, but it was unsuccessful.

Foto: HAI THANH/ SPIEGEL ONLINE
Photos from Nguyen Kien's album showing previous races and memories.

Photos from Nguyen Kien's album showing previous races and memories.

Foto: HAI THANH/ SPIEGEL ONLINE
Photo Gallery: A Sporting Life Despite Agent Orange
Foto: HAI THANH/ SPIEGEL ONLINE
Fotostrecke

Photo Gallery: A Sporting Life Despite Agent Orange

Nguyen Van Bat with his daughter Thi.

Nguyen Van Bat with his daughter Thi.

Foto: HAI THANH/ SPIEGEL ONLINE
Nguyen Van Bat's second daughter Nguyen Le Thanh is severely disabled as a result of her father's exposure to Agent Orange.

Nguyen Van Bat's second daughter Nguyen Le Thanh is severely disabled as a result of her father's exposure to Agent Orange.

Foto: HAI THANH/ SPIEGEL ONLINE

This piece is part of the Global Societies series. The project runs for three years and is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.