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Jelca Kollatsch

3D Printing for Amputees A New Leg for Joan

Thirty million people in developing countries need either a prosthetic limb or some other form of orthopedic assistance. Can 3D printing help them?
The CoRSU Rehabilitation Hospital in Kampala

The CoRSU Rehabilitation Hospital in Kampala

Jelca Kollatsch
Orthopedic technician Jenan Taremwa scans Gwokyalya's stump, with the data appearing digitally on the screen. The scan only takes a couple of minutes, but printing the socket takes longer than eight hours.

Orthopedic technician Jenan Taremwa scans Gwokyalya's stump, with the data appearing digitally on the screen. The scan only takes a couple of minutes, but printing the socket takes longer than eight hours.

Jelca Kollatsch
Jelca Kollatsch
Icon: Spiegel
Jelca Kollatsch
Uli Maier works for Otto Bock, one of the largest medical technology companies in the world. He researches the 3D printing of prosthetics, but he is skeptical of the current hype surrounding the technology.

Uli Maier works for Otto Bock, one of the largest medical technology companies in the world. He researches the 3D printing of prosthetics, but he is skeptical of the current hype surrounding the technology.

Jelca Kollatsch
Jelca Kollatsch
Aurélia learned how to use 3D modeling programs during her architecture studies. She's helping the prosthetic team and improving the hand's appearance on the computer.

Aurélia learned how to use 3D modeling programs during her architecture studies. She's helping the prosthetic team and improving the hand's appearance on the computer.

Icon: Spiegel
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