Childbirth in the Pandemic How COVID-19 Is Indirectly Killing Mothers and Babies

Since the beginning of the pandemic, the rate of death among women and infants during or shortly after birth has risen considerably. The virus has caused shortages in hospitals, and led many women to avoid seeking help.
Midwife Emily Owino cuts the umbilical cord of a newborn girl with a razor blade in Kenya.

Midwife Emily Owino cuts the umbilical cord of a newborn girl with a razor blade in Kenya.

Foto: 

Brian Inganga/ AP

Global Societies Pfeil nach rechts
All Articles Pfeil nach rechts
The birth lasted several hours. Veronica Atieno bites down on a wooden spoon in order to better tolerate the pain.

The birth lasted several hours. Veronica Atieno bites down on a wooden spoon in order to better tolerate the pain.

Foto: 

Brian Inganga/ AP

"We are more than concerned. That is in part due to reports that we have received from countries like Kenya and Bangladesh, but also due to our knowledge of developments that other epidemics have triggered."

Rebekka Frick, Save the Children

A baby shortly after a home birth in Mexico City on May 25. Mexico reports a heightened rate of maternal mortality since the spread of the coronavirus.

A baby shortly after a home birth in Mexico City on May 25. Mexico reports a heightened rate of maternal mortality since the spread of the coronavirus.

Foto: Gustavo Graf Maldonado / REUTERS
In late May, 24-year-old Karla Lopez Rangel gives birth with the help of a midwife and her husband.

In late May, 24-year-old Karla Lopez Rangel gives birth with the help of a midwife and her husband.

Foto: 

Gustavo Graf Maldonado / REUTERS

Shaniz Joy Juma, the baby from Kenya, about one month after her birth, with her father.

Shaniz Joy Juma, the baby from Kenya, about one month after her birth, with her father.

Foto: 

Brian Inganga/ AP

This piece is part of the Global Societies series. The project runs for three years and is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Mehr lesen über