Coronavirus in South America What the Death of a Maid Means for Brazil

Well-off Brazilians have brought the coronavirus back home with them from their travels. Many of them also employ domestic workers from the country's favelas - who they're apparently unwilling to protect by telling them to stay home. Brazil's poorest class could make easy quarry for the disease.
By Marian Blasberg in Rio de Janeiro
Commuters crowd into a bus in Rio de Janeiro during the coronavirus outbreak.

Commuters crowd into a bus in Rio de Janeiro during the coronavirus outbreak.

RICARDO MORAES/ REUTERS
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Commuters in Rio de Janeiro

Commuters in Rio de Janeiro

Silvia Izquierdo/ AP
In the Rochinha favela, around 50,000 people crowd into a single square kilometer.

In the Rochinha favela, around 50,000 people crowd into a single square kilometer.

YASUYOSHI CHIBA/ AFP
A homeless person in Rio de Janeiro

A homeless person in Rio de Janeiro

Wagner Meier/ Getty Images
Raull Santiago wonders what will happen to the neediest people who don't have any savings or a social safety net.

Raull Santiago wonders what will happen to the neediest people who don't have any savings or a social safety net.

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A volunteer carries soap and laundry detergent to the Rochinha favela.

A volunteer carries soap and laundry detergent to the Rochinha favela.

Leo Correa/ AP
People wait in line in Rio de Janeiro for coffee and bread.

People wait in line in Rio de Janeiro for coffee and bread.

Wagner Meier/ Getty Images

This piece is part of the Global Societies series. The project runs for three years and is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

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