Criminalizing the Sick Argentina's Authoritarian Corona Regime

The Argentinian province of Formosa is pursuing an authoritarian approach to the coronavirus pandemic. Those suspected of infection were being seized and locked away in overcrowded quarantine centers. Meanwhile, the province's official infection numbers are likely untrustworthy.
By Nicola Abé in São Paulo
People sticking their hands through the barred window of an isolation center in the Argentinian province of Formosa

People sticking their hands through the barred window of an isolation center in the Argentinian province of Formosa

Foto: Leo Fernández
Global Societies
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Laura Rodríguez was brought to an isolation camp with her children.

Laura Rodríguez was brought to an isolation camp with her children.

Foto: Laura Rodriguez
A quarantine center in the Argentinian capital of Buenos Aires

A quarantine center in the Argentinian capital of Buenos Aires

Foto: Natacha Pisarenko / AP
A woman protesting against the strict coronavirus control measures in the province of Formosa

A woman protesting against the strict coronavirus control measures in the province of Formosa

Foto: Nathaniel Caceres / AP
This isolation center in the Argentinian province of Formosa has now been closed.

This isolation center in the Argentinian province of Formosa has now been closed.

Foto: privat
Journalist Julieta González at a protest in Formosa

Journalist Julieta González at a protest in Formosa

Foto: Julieta Gonzales
This tent city in the Argentinian province of Formosa has now been closed. It served as an isolation center for those infected with the coronavirus, especially from poorer areas.

This tent city in the Argentinian province of Formosa has now been closed. It served as an isolation center for those infected with the coronavirus, especially from poorer areas.

Foto: privat

This piece is part of the Global Societies series. The project runs for three years and is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.