Feeding the World in Times of Climate Change "We Can Learn a Lot from Indigenous Peoples"

The way we eat is destroying the world, says agricultural economist Yon Fernández de Larrinoa. His research focuses on the food systems of indigenous peoples, and believes they can teach us valuable lessons.
Interview Conducted by Nicola Abé in São Paulo
An indigenous man from the Uro people fishing in Peru.

An indigenous man from the Uro people fishing in Peru.

Foto: Janina Zasche / Universal Images Group / Getty Images
Global Societies
All Articles
People from the Yanomami fishing in the Amazon rainforest in Venezuela.

People from the Yanomami fishing in the Amazon rainforest in Venezuela.

Foto: DEA / G. SIOEN / De Agostini via Getty Images
Indigenous women from the Santal planting rice in Bangladesh.

Indigenous women from the Santal planting rice in Bangladesh.

Foto: Mehedi Hasan / ZUMA Wire / IMAGO
The Paris-based start-up Ynsect produces and processes mealworms to feed both people and animals.

The Paris-based start-up Ynsect produces and processes mealworms to feed both people and animals.

Foto: ynsect
Inuit hunters with a bowhead whale on the pack ice of Alaska.

Inuit hunters with a bowhead whale on the pack ice of Alaska.

Foto: Steven Kazlowski / Nature Picture Library / IMAGO
An indigenous woman from the Tatuyo people in the Brazilian rainforest holding a bowl of roasted ants.

An indigenous woman from the Tatuyo people in the Brazilian rainforest holding a bowl of roasted ants.

Foto: Rogério Vieira / DER SPIEGEL
Huge amounts of rainforest have been clear cut for soya plantations such as this one in the Amazon.

Huge amounts of rainforest have been clear cut for soya plantations such as this one in the Amazon.

Foto: Ricardo Beliel / LightRocket / Getty Images

This piece is part of the Global Societies series. The project runs for three years and is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.