Healing Societal Rifts A Photographic Journey through South Sudan's Burgeoning Music Scene

South Sudan declared independence 10 years ago – only to descend into civil war. Now, young rappers, bands and dance troupes are hoping that music can help bring the country together.
By Sonja Peteranderl und Jean-Baptiste Hervé and Adrienne Surprenant (Photos)
Young musicians singing and dancing at Asylum Records Studio in Juba

Young musicians singing and dancing at Asylum Records Studio in Juba

Foto: Adrienne Surprenant / Collectif Item
Global Societies
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The youth of South Sudan have grown up in an independent country, but it is one torn apart by ethnic violence and poverty.

The youth of South Sudan have grown up in an independent country, but it is one torn apart by ethnic violence and poverty.

Foto: Adrienne Surprenant / Collectif Item
Rasta Jimmy hopes his singing can contribute to peace.

Rasta Jimmy hopes his singing can contribute to peace.

Foto: Adrienne Surprenant / Collectif Item
Colorful T-shirts and traditional jewelry: Young women from the Lopid tribe, an ethnic minority in South Sudan, dance at a wedding.

Colorful T-shirts and traditional jewelry: Young women from the Lopid tribe, an ethnic minority in South Sudan, dance at a wedding.

Foto: Adrienne Surprenant / Collectif Item
Fotostrecke

Musicians in South Sudan: Creating the Soundtrack for the World's Youngest Nation

Foto: Adrienne Surprenant / Collectif Item

This piece is part of the Global Societies series. The project runs for three years and is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.