Summer of Anxiety Have We Finally Broken the Climate?

Heat domes in Canada, flooding in Germany, droughts in Africa and Central Asia: This summer has seen some worrying weather. How closely is it tied to climate change? Scientists around the world are trying to find out.
DER SPIEGEL 32/2021
SPIEGEL International
"Climate change causes heatwaves. That is as well proven as the fact that smoking causes cancer."

Friederike Otto, climate researcher at the University of Oxford

Meltwater carves its way through a Greenland glacier.

Meltwater carves its way through a Greenland glacier.

Foto: Sean Gallup/ Getty Images

Sources: KNMI, WMO

Extreme weather events, such as the flash floods that struck Germany earlier this summer, are directly related to climate change.

Extreme weather events, such as the flash floods that struck Germany earlier this summer, are directly related to climate change.

Foto: B&S/Bernd März / imago images/Bernd März
"It could be that our models are more stable than reality."

Jochem Marotzke, climate researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg

Carcasses of animals that have died as a result of a severe drought in Kazakhstan this summer.

Carcasses of animals that have died as a result of a severe drought in Kazakhstan this summer.

Foto: PAVEL MIKHEYEV / REUTERS

Sources: KNMI, WMO

"The next 10 years will show whether we will be successful in changing course."

Johan Rockström, co-director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research

Storm clouds gathering above Bikeman Islet, located just off South Tarawa in the Pacific island nation of Kiribati. The country is facing potential evacuation as sea levels continue to rise.

Storm clouds gathering above Bikeman Islet, located just off South Tarawa in the Pacific island nation of Kiribati. The country is facing potential evacuation as sea levels continue to rise.

Foto: DAVID GRAY/ REUTERS